English thread. Why not?

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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by yum13241 »

Well, can't seem to find it, bet rest assured I didn't make this up, nor would I make this up, some of these words would never be typed on my keyboard.
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by Gez »

The point was that the post you responded to was not in any way recent. It's on the first page of the thread and was made in 2017...
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by yum13241 »

I tend to read the first couple pages first, before I read the last one. My apologies.
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by Gez »

That's perfectly fine, you should just keep in mind to look at the age of the post you reply to; regardless of which page it's present on. And if it's an old post and there's plenty of pages after it, maybe check if somebody else hasn't made the same point you wanted to make long ago.
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by yum13241 »

Understood.
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by Enjay »

I thought I'd piggy-back onto this thread to ask an English to Spanish question. It doesn't seem worth starting a new thread for.

If I was say "I have called you a taxi" or "I have called the lift" - in both cases using "called" to mean "summoned" rather than "I called him a name", how should that look in Spanish?

Google tells me "Te he llamado un taxi" and "He llamado al ascensor". However, my Spanish is non-existent and my daughter's high-school Spanish isn't up to it either.

The main point of concern is that we both know that "my name is..." translates to "Me llamo..." (presumably literally "I am called...") so we are just wary that there might be a different way to say that you have called/summoned something rather than using "llamado" which looks like it is related to llamo, and therefore might be Google translate getting confused and trying to translate it as if I am calling the taxi/lift a name.
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by Gez »

Judging from the examples here, llamado is perfectly valid in both meanings.
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by Enjay »

Problem solved. Thank you. :)
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by ramon.dexter »

Enjay wrote:I thought I'd piggy-back onto this thread to ask an English to Spanish question. It doesn't seem worth starting a new thread for.

If I was say "I have called you a taxi" or "I have called the lift" - in both cases using "called" to mean "summoned" rather than "I called him a name", how should that look in Spanish?

Google tells me "Te he llamado un taxi" and "He llamado al ascensor". However, my Spanish is non-existent and my daughter's high-school Spanish isn't up to it either.

The main point of concern is that we both know that "my name is..." translates to "Me llamo..." (presumably literally "I am called...") so we are just wary that there might be a different way to say that you have called/summoned something rather than using "llamado" which looks like it is related to llamo, and therefore might be Google translate getting confused and trying to translate it as if I am calling the taxi/lift a name.
This looks generally as a slight confusion between continental european languages and english. For me as a non-native english speaker, who actually learned both english, spanish and german languages, is this little issue with 'to call a taxi'/ 'he llamado un taxi' is just the basic confusion with (not sure here if I use the correct term) the literral meaning of the word. Google translate has little to none understanding of the context, in which is the word used. Also, it just translates the word with a correct equivalent in the target lang.. So, this is just not an actual issue. We, as our rains work differently, are able to tell the difference. Computer script cannot tell the difference.

Also, czech language is quite plastic in this case. We could say 'zavolat taxi', that could be translated as 'to call a taxi', but not as 'llamar un taxi', because the spanish sentence means actually 'to name a taxi' when translated to czech. Also, czech sentence 'jmenuji se ...' could be roughly translated to english 'I'm called ...', but this would be a very rough translation. Correct translation would be 'my name is ...', which could be translated as spanish 'me llamo ...'.
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by Gez »

By the way, I've found out that generally, DeepL is more accurate than Google Translate. The only drawbacks are that sometimes the automatic language detection messes up (so check that it actually has found the proper language, and if not, set it) and that it knows a lot less languages than Google.
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by ramon.dexter »

Yeah, the deepL does a great job.
My collegue found this translator, developed by czech student on Charle's University. It is said to be more accurate than even translation done by professional translator.
Check it out:
https://lindat.mff.cuni.cz/services/translation/
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by Ravick »

Hi there, again. :)

Just a quickly question I couldn't find on my own: how is it called the part of a train station/airport where you actually wait for and get onboard of the velhice? The literal translation from Portuguese would be "boarding platform", but when I google it I just found stuff about the place where you get on boats/ships.

Thanks in advanced. :)
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by Rachael »

Boarding platform works, boarding area, loading ramp, loading dock, boarding dock, pretty much any combination of boarding/loading area/ramp/dock/platform.
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by Enjay »

Yup, "boarding platform" works. Certainly, around here, just "platform" on its own would be used by most people. Although the word "platform" can be used in many contexts (an offshore oil platform, a platform from which to launch your career etc) usually the context would be clear enough. e.g. if you are at a station and someone says "you can get your ticket on the platform" there isn't really any doubt as to what they are talking about.
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Re: English thread. Why not?

Post by Gez »

For a train, it's railway platform but if context is clear you can just use "platform" alone, e.g. Platform 9¾ from Harry Potter.

For a plane, the term generally used is gate. For security reasons, you wait in a lounge and only get to access the gate when it's boarding time, then you board through the mobile bridge.

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