8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby XanderK9 » Sun Dec 13, 2015 8:55 am

MetroidJunkie wrote:So someone in another forum with a similar problem seemed to suggest that the problem could be that the default settings aren't providing enough volts that the RAM requires and that simply changing that in the BiOS will fix it but I'm not exactly sure where this option is. If it helps, the computer specifically is a Dell HQ Compaq DC7900 Mini-Tower.


It is quite possible. There was a multiple instances that I had very picky RAM and/or motherboard and was only able to make the system stable by setting the DIMM's voltage and memory timing manually in the BIOS according to the specifications.

There's also the possibility for the memory to be simply incompatible with the motherboard, which is quite rare (to me, anyway), but still possible.
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby MetroidJunkie » Sun Dec 13, 2015 9:00 am

I can't find any options in the BiOS and, apparently, HP straight out doesn't allow for the option. The RAM said it was for Desktop Intel so I don't know why it wouldn't be compatible. What's weirder is that the "recommended" RAM for this computer actually uses MORE voltage than this RAM, 1.8V compared to 1.5V
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby XanderK9 » Sun Dec 13, 2015 9:25 am

Branded computers usually don't give such options. Also, the ram may be made for Intel computers, but that doesn't mean that every single motherboards are made the same way.

Example, my model of MacBook Pro cannot take RAM higher than 1333 Mhz even if it's ram made for Apple computers due to an limitation of the chipset. Another one: the RAM I originally bought for my previous motherboard, regardless of the settings I was using, made my computer crash on completely random basis, even if that was memory made for Intel motherboards and I know they were perfectly good. It turns out that the motherboard's chipset didn't like the RAM's memory chips and switching to something that was listed with the motherboard's known good list made the problem go away.
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby MetroidJunkie » Sun Dec 13, 2015 9:27 am

Well, the system information had it at the correct speed and the temperatures before it crashed (With 2 of the sticks) was pretty much the same as with the old RAM installed. I'm at a loss as to what the problem is, is it possible for it to crash because the RAM is receiving too MUCH voltage?
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby XanderK9 » Sun Dec 13, 2015 9:35 am

It's possible, especially if the motherboard and/or RAM installed are very picky.

Also, even if the new and old memory have the same specs, they may be using different parts, which may not be working well together and certain motherboards may not like it either.
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby MetroidJunkie » Sun Dec 13, 2015 9:37 am

The memory test in the BiOS never gives me any kind of errors and it usually waits a while (Although, with all 4 installed, it now won't even make it past the logo when it's booting up) before outright shutting off. If the motherboard just didn't like it, then wouldn't it give me problems from the get-go? The system information even correctly identifies the RAM speed as well as how many gigabytes it is. The only notice I ever get booting up is that the amount of memory had changed.
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby XanderK9 » Sun Dec 13, 2015 9:47 am

The memory test in the POST is not a conclusive way to determine if it's good or not. I don't think I ever saw an verbose memory error (as in, other than beep codes or a black screen) in a modern system on POST.
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby MetroidJunkie » Sun Dec 13, 2015 11:12 am

Well, I can't exactly test it on a program when the system loads since it crashes before it can even give me any results.
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby XanderK9 » Sun Dec 13, 2015 12:22 pm

There's tools, like Memtest86 that allows you to test the RAM without going into the OS. Just need to put it into a bootable media.
Last edited by XanderK9 on Sun Dec 13, 2015 12:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby ibm5155 » Sun Dec 13, 2015 12:28 pm

A Ram stick uses as much energy as a usb 3.0 device (not counting that monstruous 75Watts support from the new usb).
It sounds more like Bad ram (or bad contact), try testing it with memtest86 and also cleaning the memory and the connector
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby Blzut3 » Sun Dec 13, 2015 2:57 pm

Memtest86 won't necessarily tell you if the RAM itself is bad. In fact I've only ever seen it mark failures when the issue was the memory controller. (That is known bad sticks passing extended memtest86 runs but BSOD'ing every computer it was put in. On the other hand I've seen failures in memtest86 where the stick lived happily in another system.) For example my uncle had a laptop which was rated to take 2GB of memory, but would fail memtest86 if you put 2GB in it. Reduced to 1.5GB and put the other 1GB stick in another laptop and neither machine had a problem.

So to me it seems way more likely to be a memory timing issue. The likelihood that he has more than one bad module seems awfully slim to me. It's unfortunate that prebuilt computers lock down their BIOS so much, and IMO this is one of the biggest reasons to build your own system. No OEM BS.
edward850 wrote:Indeed. I can't actually find PSUs at such a low rating in my local market, as most motherboards expect a higher rating. It should be noted that if your RAM really is maxing out your PSU, you are stretching your power requirements dangerously thin already.

I bought a few 80-plus gold 360W PSUs for my Atom based file servers and that was the smallest I could find. Even ran my HD5770 on them for fun without issues. Of course even though 360W would probably be enough for most people they would be crazy to buy these things since you can get an equally good 500W for the same price or less. Power supplies have definitely crept up in wattage when dual GPUs combined with over clocking was all the rage and never really came back down.
XanderK9 wrote:Example, my model of MacBook Pro cannot take RAM higher than 1333 Mhz even if it's ram made for Apple computers due to an limitation of the chipset. Another one: the RAM I originally bought for my previous motherboard, regardless of the settings I was using, made my computer crash on completely random basis, even if that was memory made for Intel motherboards and I know they were perfectly good. It turns out that the motherboard's chipset didn't like the RAM's memory chips and switching to something that was listed with the motherboard's known good list made the problem go away.

Apple's memory support is stupidly picky. I bought some faster rated RAM because it was the same price for my Mac Mini and it of course didn't work. The good news was that my brother had a module of equal capacity and correct speed in his Lenovo W700ds so I yanked that and paired it with one of the faster modules. Since the speeds differed the Mac underclocked the new module and is running happily. The Lenovo also works just fine and he got bumped up to 5GB of memory by using the old Apple module as well.
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby MetroidJunkie » Sun Dec 13, 2015 4:08 pm

Well, in either case, I'm using memtest86 v4.20 so hopefully it'll tell me if anything is wrong. As I said before, though, I seriously doubt RAM timing is the problem because the BiOS allowed me to at least see information about my system and it had the RAM marked as 667MHz which is the speed on the actual RAM itself so I'm guessing it should be fine there. Just in case, I also swabbed all the connectors down.
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby XanderK9 » Sun Dec 13, 2015 5:01 pm

Blzut3 wrote:Apple's memory support is stupidly picky. I bought some faster rated RAM because it was the same price for my Mac Mini and it of course didn't work. The good news was that my brother had a module of equal capacity and correct speed in his Lenovo W700ds so I yanked that and paired it with one of the faster modules. Since the speeds differed the Mac underclocked the new module and is running happily. The Lenovo also works just fine and he got bumped up to 5GB of memory by using the old Apple module as well.


I usually don't have problem upgrading memory on an Apple computer until I happened to have a model that came with the Nvidia Geforce 320M. It's not much of an inconvenience as long I was able to find a compatible set of memory on the web since what I usually find local was 1600 MHz.

MetroidJunkie wrote:As I said before, though, I seriously doubt RAM timing is the problem because the BiOS allowed me to at least see information about my system and it had the RAM marked as 667MHz which is the speed on the actual RAM itself so I'm guessing it should be fine there.


Memory timings is not just about the frequency.
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby MetroidJunkie » Fri Dec 18, 2015 9:49 am

By chance, does the PC2 number have an impact on the RAM? I just realized that the RAM I got is PC2-5300 while the RAM my computer uses is PC2-6400 and I just so happened to find PC2-6400 for relatively the same price. Should I have gotten that instead?
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Re: 8GB of RAM too much for a 365-watt PSU?

Postby XanderK9 » Fri Dec 18, 2015 10:00 am

There is, but I wouldn't believe there's a noticeable difference in speed. Regarding stability, it shouldn't make an impact unless something in the system is picky since the faster memory would downclock to the slowest one, unless both has been downclocked to the maximum speed that the motherboard allows.
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